Hypnosis and Hypnotherapy Center | South Africa

Hypnotherapy is well known for treatment in habit breaking, smoking, phobias, stress related issues and pain relief using regression therapy. It is also extremely valuable in working with sports enhancement, weight loss, motivation, self-esteem, anxiety and panic attacks, insomnia, increased confidence...

5 Benefits of Hypnotherapy

Hypnotherapy is a method of therapy that involves deeply relaxing the body and tapping into the subconscious mind with the power of hypnosis.

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Endorsed by both the American and British Medical Associations, hypnotherapy has a wide variety of applications and a multitude of potential benefits. Regular hypnotherapy sessions can transform your life in a number of ways.

Here are five of the biggest ways that hypnotherapy can be truly life-changing:

1. Hypnotherapy Can Help You Break Bad Habits.

All of us have one or two bad habits that we would like to be free of, but actually overcoming them can be hard. Hypnotherapy can help by addressing the underlying subconscious messages that cause you to repeat unwanted behaviours. With hypnosis, your internal urges to continue with a bad habit can be replaced with positive messages that give you the mental strength and willpower to make a change for the better. Hypnotherapy can be used to address a wide variety of habits like overspending, drinking too much alcohol, smoking and overeating. It can also put an end to procrastinating behaviours that undermine your performance at work and your ability to accomplish tasks in your personal life.

2. Hypnotherapy Can Improve Your Mental and Physical Health.

Because hypnotherapy has the ability to change ways of thinking, it is often used as an alternative intervention for mental health concerns (although a doctor should always be consulted first before beginning any complimentary therapy). Hypnosis can eliminate the irrational fears that cause a variety of phobias from a fear of heights to a fear of driving to a fear of public speaking. The relaxation benefits of hypnosis can be highly beneficial for people with anxiety disorders, and hypnotherapy can even improve mood to ease feelings of depression. Experts also recommend hypnosis as a complementary intervention for obsessive compulsive disorder.

Science has established that there is a powerful connection between the body and mind, and hypnotherapy can allow you to capitalize on this bond to address the symptoms of a number of medical concerns. Hypnosis has been shown to be a highly beneficial alternative pain management intervention for back pain, headaches and other types of chronic pain, and its stress relief benefits can reduce symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome and other medical conditions.

Hypnotherapy can also help you give up bad habits or adopt new habits that will help you to lead a healthier life. Hypnosis can assist with weight loss, help you to improve your diet and give you the encouragement that you need to work out on a regular basis. You can also use hypnotherapy to improve sleep and combat insomnia.

3. Hypnotherapy Can Improve The Way You Think.

Our minds can be our worst enemies, as negative ways of thinking can be a detriment to everything that we do. Because hypnotherapy has the power to act on the subconscious mind, it can change the way you think for the better. Hypnosis is an effective way to increase self-esteem, boost self-confidence, increase your belief in yourself and reduce feelings of worry. You can also use hypnosis to become more assertive and creative or to improve your ability to remember and concentrate.

4. Hypnotherapy Can Help You Achieve Your Goals.

Everyone has goals that they want to achieve, but often our minds interfere with our ability to succeed. Hypnotherapy can ensure that you have the proper mindset to make your dreams a reality. For students, hypnosis can improve study habits and improve performance on exams. Professionals can use hypnosis to increase their leadership abilities, improve their productivity and make themselves more receptive to opportunities to make money or advance their careers. Athletes can improve their performance in training and competition by strengthening their minds with hypnosis, and hypnotherapy can also increase motivation and energy levels during workouts.

5. Hypnotherapy Can Improve Your Relationships.

Self-improvement with hypnotherapy can help you to mend troubled and strained relationships. Hypnosis is an effective way to overcome personality traits and behaviours that interfere with your ability to connect with others and that cause conflict with friends, family and romantic partners. Through hypnotherapy, you can overcome anger issues, jealousy and shyness and even recover from the pain of past relationships that makes it hard for you to trust and open up to a partner. Those who are looking for love can use hypnosis to make themselves more attractive to prospective partners, and for those in relationships, hypnosis is a proven way to improve sexual performance and address sexual problems like a lack of libido, impotency and premature ejaculation.

I have a Free collection of hypnosis MP3  downloads that allow you to incorporate hypnotherapy Binaural Beats and Affirmations into your daily life with ease.

Hypnotherapy can truly change your life for the better, and benefiting from hypnosis can be easier than you think.

Ref:. mbhypnosisdownloads.com

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The content in this publication is presented for informative purposes only. In no sense is this information intended to provide diagnoses or act as a substitute for the work of a qualified professional. For this we recommend that you contact a reliable specialist.

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a common type of talk therapy. You work with a mental health therapist in a structured way, attending a limited number of sessions.

CBT is one of the most researched types of therapy, in part because treatment is focused on highly specific goals and results can be measured relatively easily. CBT helps you become aware of inaccurate or negative thinking so you can view challenging situations more clearly and respond to them in a more effective way.

CBT can be a very helpful tool – either alone or in combination with other therapies – in treating mental health disorders, such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or an eating disorder. But not everyone who benefits from CBT has a mental health condition. CBT can be an effective tool to help anyone learn how to better manage stressful life situations.

Cognitive behavioral therapy is used to treat a wide range of issues. It’s often the preferred type of psychotherapy because it can quickly help you identify and cope with specific challenges. It generally requires fewer sessions than other types of therapy and is done in a structured way.

CBT is a useful tool to address emotional challenges.

For example, it may help you:

  • Manage symptoms of mental illness
  • Prevent a relapse of mental illness symptoms
  • Treat a mental illness when medications aren’t a good option
  • Learn techniques for coping with stressful life situations
  • Identify ways to manage emotions
  • Resolve relationship conflicts and learn better ways to communicate
  • Cope with grief or loss
  • Overcome emotional trauma related to abuse or violence
  • Cope with a medical illness
  • Manage chronic physical symptoms

Mental health disorders that may improve with CBT include:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety disorders
  • Phobias
  • PTSD
  • Sleep disorders
  • Eating disorders
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)
  • Substance use disorders
  • Bipolar disorders
  • Schizophrenia
  • Sexual disorders

In some cases, CBT is most effective when it’s combined with other treatments, such as antidepressants or other medications.

Risks

In general, there’s little risk in getting cognitive behavioral therapy. But you may feel emotionally uncomfortable at times. This is because CBT can cause you to explore painful feelings, emotions and experiences. You may cry, get upset or feel angry during a challenging session. You may also feel physically drained.

Some forms of CBT, such as exposure therapy, may require you to confront situations you’d rather avoid – such as airplanes if you have a fear of flying. This can lead to temporary stress or anxiety.

However, working with a skilled therapist will minimize any risks. The coping skills you learn can help you manage and conquer negative feelings and fears.

How you prepare

You might decide on your own that you want to try cognitive behavioral therapy. Or a doctor or someone else may suggest therapy to you.

Here’s how to get started:

Find a therapist. You can get a referral from a doctor, health insurance plan, friend or other trusted source. Many employers offer counseling services or referrals through employee assistance programs (EAP’s). Or you can find a therapist on your own – for instance, through a local or state psychological association or by searching the internet.

Understand the costs. If you have health insurance, find out what coverage it offers for psychotherapy. Some health plans cover only a certain number of therapy sessions a year. Also, talk to your therapist about fees and payment options.

Review your concerns. Before your first appointment, think about what issues you’d like to work on. While you can also sort this out with your therapist, having some sense in advance may provide a starting point.

What you can expect

Cognitive behavioral therapy may be done one-on-one or in groups with family members or with people who have similar issues. Online resources are available that may make participating in CBT possible, especially if you live in an area with few local mental health resources.

CBT often includes:

  • Learning about your mental health condition
  • Learning and practicing techniques such as relaxation, coping, resilience, stress management and assertiveness

Your first therapy session

At your first session, your therapist will typically gather information about you and ask what concerns you’d like to work on. The therapist will likely ask you about your current and past physical and emotional health to gain a deeper understanding of your situation. Your therapist may discuss whether you might benefit from other treatment as well, such as medications.

The first session is also an opportunity for you to interview your therapist to see if he or she will be a good match for you. Make sure you understand:

  • His or her approach
  • What type of therapy is appropriate for you
  • The goals of your treatment
  • The length of each session
  • How many therapy sessions you may need

It might take a few sessions for your therapist to fully understand your situation and concerns, and to determine the best course of action. If you don’t feel comfortable with the first therapist you see, try someone else. Having a good “fit” with your therapist can help you get the most benefit from CBT.

During CBT

Your therapist will encourage you to talk about your thoughts and feelings and what’s troubling you. Don’t worry if you find it hard to open up about your feelings. Your therapist can help you gain more confidence and comfort.

CBT generally focuses on specific problems, using a goal-oriented approach. As you go through the therapy process, your therapist may ask you to do homework – activities, reading or practices that build on what you learn during your regular therapy sessions – and encourage you to apply what you’re learning in your daily life.

Your therapist’s approach will depend on your particular situation and preferences. Your therapist may combine CBT with another therapeutic approach – for example, interpersonal therapy, which focuses on your relationships with other people.

Steps in CBT

CBT typically includes these steps:

  • Identify troubling situations or conditions in your life. These may include such issues as a medical condition, divorce, grief, anger or symptoms of a mental health disorder. You and your therapist may spend some time deciding what problems and goals you want to focus on.
  • Become aware of your thoughts, emotions and beliefs about these problems. Once you’ve identified the problems to work on, your therapist will encourage you to share your thoughts about them. This may include observing what you tell yourself about an experience (self-talk), your interpretation of the meaning of a situation, and your beliefs about yourself, other people and events. Your therapist may suggest that you keep a journal of your thoughts.
  • Identify negative or inaccurate thinking. To help you recognize patterns of thinking and behavior that may be contributing to your problem, your therapist may ask you to pay attention to your physical, emotional and behavioral responses in different situations.
  • Reshape negative or inaccurate thinking. Your therapist will likely encourage you to ask yourself whether your view of a situation is based on fact or on an inaccurate perception of what’s going on. This step can be difficult. You may have long-standing ways of thinking about your life and yourself. With practice, helpful thinking and behavior patterns will become a habit and won’t take as much effort.

Length of therapy

CBT is generally considered short-term therapy – ranging from about five to 20 sessions. You and your therapist can discuss how many sessions may be right for you. Factors to consider include:

Type of disorder or situation

  • Severity of your symptoms
  • How long you’ve had your symptoms or have been dealing with your situation
  • How quickly you make progress
  • How much stress you’re experiencing
  • How much support you receive from family members and other people

Confidentiality

Except in very specific circumstances, conversations with your therapist are confidential. However, a therapist may break confidentiality if there is an immediate threat to safety or when required by state or federal law to report concerns to authorities.

These situations include:

  • Threatening to immediately or soon (imminently) harm yourself or take your own life
  • Threatening to imminently harm or take the life of another person
  • Abusing a child or a vulnerable adult – someone over age 18 who is hospitalized or made vulnerable by a disability
  • Being unable to safely care for yourself

Results

Cognitive behavioral therapy may not cure your condition or make an unpleasant situation go away. But it can give you the power to cope with your situation in a healthy way and to feel better about yourself and your life.

Getting the most out of CBT

CBT isn’t effective for everyone. But you can take steps to get the most out of your therapy and help make it a success.

  • Approach therapy as a partnership. Therapy is most effective when you’re an active participant and share in decision-making. Make sure you and your therapist agree about the major issues and how to tackle them. Together, you can set goals and assess progress over time.
  • Be open and honest. Success with therapy depends on your willingness to share your thoughts, feelings and experiences, and on being open to new insights and ways of doing things. If you’re reluctant to talk about certain things because of painful emotions, embarrassment or fears about your therapist’s reaction, let your therapist know about your reservations.
  • Stick to your treatment plan. If you feel down or lack motivation, it may be tempting to skip therapy sessions. Doing so can disrupt your progress. Attend all sessions and give some thought to what you want to discuss.
  • Don’t expect instant results. Working on emotional issues can be painful and often requires hard work. It’s not uncommon to feel worse during the initial part of therapy as you begin to confront past and current conflicts. You may need several sessions before you begin to see improvement.
  • Do your homework between sessions. If your therapist asks you to read, keep a journal or do other activities outside of your regular therapy sessions, follow through. Doing these homework assignments will help you apply what you’ve learned in the therapy sessions.
  • If therapy isn’t helping, talk to your therapist. If you don’t feel that you’re benefiting from CBT after several sessions, talk to your therapist about it. You and your therapist may decide to make some changes or try a different approach.

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a type of psychotherapeutic treatment that helps people learn how to identify and change destructive or disturbing thought patterns that have a negative influence on behavior and emotions.

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